Posts Tagged ‘Windows 10’

Summary:

Microsoft releases Windows 10 Version 2004 May 2020 Update

Comments:

  1. Microsoft released the latest major feature update(named May 2020 Update) for Windows 10 Version 2004 Build 19041.264 today(May 27, 2020)
  2. Windows 10 Version 2004 is now available for devices running Windows 10 1909 and 1903 to mainstream consumers and business users that wish to manually install the feature update via Windows Update ‘Check for Updates’.  (Note: Not all devices may be deemed ready to install Windows 10 2004 – MSFT is gradually throttling up the availability(staged deployment). Additionally, a safeguard may be in place for compatibility reasons to ensure a “good update experience”)
  3. Windows 10 Version 2004 is also available via The Windows 10 download site,  using the ‘Update Assistant – Update Now’ and the Windows 10 Media Creation Tool. (Notes:  See ‘Additional Information’ Section for link/pic; See Note in Comment #2 -‘safeguards in place for compatibility’)
  4. Windows 10 Version 2004 will be deployed/rolled out automatically via Windows Update(not all capable devices will receive the feature update at the same time)
  5. Windows 10 Version 2004 May 2020 Update can update a Windows 10 device where the prior installed versions is Windows 10 Version 1909 or 1903

 

Additional Information:

 

Revisions:

May 27 2020: Initial Draft

May 27 2020: Original Publish Date

Summary:

Microsoft extends End of Service date for Windows 10 Version 1809

Comments:

  • Microsoft announced on April 14, 2020 that the ‘End-of-Service’ date for Windows 10 1809 has been extended to November 10, 2020 instead of expiring on May 12, 2020
  • The extension adds another six(6) months of support for receiving security updates
  • The extension applies to the following editions of Windows 10 1809
          • Home, Pro, Pro Education, and Pro for Workstations
  • Security updates will continue to be available through the same channels
        • Windows Update, Microsoft Catalog and Windows Server Update services
  • This End-of-Service revision also places a temporary pausing of Microsoft initiated feature upgrades from Windows 10 Version 1809 to a later Windows 10 Version(e.g. 1903, 1909)

 

Additional Information:

 

Revisions:

Apr 15 2020:  Initial Draft and Original  Publish Date

Apr 18 2020:  Added 2nd and 3rd items in the Additional Information section.

Summary:

Windows 10 devices are not able to shutdown Windows 10 while logged on to Windows 10

Comments:

  • End-users are not able to shutdown Windows 10 devices when logged onto Windows 10
    • The Windows 10 device shutdown problem appears to be associated to a recent February 2020 Adobe CC(Creative Cloud) Update.
        • The presence of the Adobe CC update when attempting to shutdown Windows 10 when logged on to Windows 10 yields an error:
          • “Restart – You don’t have permission to shut down and restart this computer”
  • End-Users must first logoff Windows 10 and use the shutdown option provided on the Windows 10 logon screen
    • Optionally end-users who have the Adobe update installed and the inability to shutdown Windows 10 may have to Stop and Disable related Adobe services(Adobe Genuine Monitor, Adobe Genuine Software Integrity, and Adobe Update services) on their Windows 10 devices in Windows 10’s Services
  • Editor Note(Mar 15) 2020): Compliments to a BLEEPINGCOMPUTER article for aiding me to track down this issue and  provide a workaround for a Windows 10 Pro SB(small business specializing in Graphic Design using Adobe CC) end-user experiencing this problem.
  • Editor Note(Mar 15 2020): Adobe has pulled /rolled-back the update causing the problem and will resolve it with a future update

 

How To:

  • If experience this problem – two workarounds are suggested:
      • Logoff Windows 10 and use the ‘Shutdown Option’ on the Windows 10 logon screen
      • Stop and disable three(3) Adobe services(Genuine Monitor, Adobe Genuine Software Integrity, and Adobe Update) in Windows 10 services
            • Windows key +R > type services/msc > OK > scroll to and ‘Stop’ and ‘Disable each of the above noted Adobe services.

 

Additional Information:

 

Revisions:

Feb 27 2020: Initial Draft Date

Mar 3 2020: Original Publish Date

Mar 4 2020: Added ‘Editor Notes’ in the Comments; added Additional Information section

Summary:

How and where to find Known Issues and their current status for Windows 10 versions

Comments:

  • Known Issues and their current status for each Windows 10 version is available from Microsoft
  • Known Issues and their current status for each Windows 10 version is included as additional information for Windows 10 Release Information
  • Each released Windows 10 version has its own dedicated itemized list of:
      • Known Issues
      • Resolved Issues
  • Each released Windows 10 version Known Issues list is broken down by:
        • Known Issues by Originating update, Status, and latest status date in table form
              • Originating Update is the Windows update involved that is causing or related to or reported to and/or validated as the cause and appearance the issue(i.e. wide scope of  actual or possible reasons)
        • Details of the known issue – supplemental information on each issue
        • Issue status by month – chronological history
  • Each released Windows 10 version Resolved Issues list is broken down by:
      • Resolved Issue by Originating update, Status, Date resolved
      • Details of the resolved issue – supplemental information on each issue
      • Issue status by month – chronological history
  • All the above information is available on Microsoft’s web site

 

How To:

  1. Open a browser and navigate to the Microsoft web site –  Windows 10 Release Information
  2. Look on the left hand side to see a list of all released Windows 10 versions
  3. Click on any Windows 10 version(e.g. 1909, 1903, etc.) to expand the version specific additional categories(‘Known issues and notifications’ or ‘Resolved issues'(see below graphic)
  4. Click on the ‘Known Issues and notifications’ or ‘Resolved Issues’ categories for additional information viewable on the web page

W10_RelInfo_01

5.  Available information and content, as expected, is dynamic and updated when necessary

 

Revisions:

Feb  1 2020: Initial and Final Draft Date

Feb  2 2020: Original Publish Date

Feb 14 2020:  Added Resolved Issues section in Comments, corrected typo(Thanks Erin – HVD!)

Summary:

How to enable/re-enable network computer appearance and access in File Explorer on Windows 10 Version 1909

Comments:

  1. This blog article provides the an overview of how to ensure connectivity, functionality, visibility and view-ability across across all networked devices/computers in Windows 10 Version 1909’s File Explorer’s Navigation pane ‘Network’ folder by configuring specific Windows 10 ‘Services when using standard and acceptable network sharing methods in Windows 10. (Editor Note: This article is also applicable to earlier versions of Windows 10 e.g. 1903, 1809, 1803, etc.)
  2. Changes made by Microsoft Updates(Feature or Monthly Cumulative or Optional or Out-of-Band) may prevent an end-users ability to view and access shared devices(computers) in File Explorer’s Navigation Pane ‘Network’ folder option.
  3. This article assumes that Windows 10 is already configured for standard network sharing. If not, see the section immediately below titled ‘Basic Guidelines for Standard Network Sharing’. If already configured for standard network sharing skip to the ‘How To’ section for configuring Windows 10 Services.

 

Guidelines for Standard Network Sharing:

  • All devices should have the exact same/common Windows logon user profiles. As an example if John has two devices(of any type – desktop and tablet or two desktops…) then John should configure each device with exact same Windows logon profile using the exact same username and password(The Windows logon profile can be a Microsoft Account or a Local Account).
        • The same commonality would also apply in more than one user per device across those same two or more devices (e.g. John and Mary Windows logon profiles with same username/password on each device)
  • Change the Workgroup name on each device from the Windows default name ‘Workgroup’ to a name of your choice(Editor note: This is optional, but since everyone on the planet for at least the last three decades knows the default Windows workgroup name, imo it’s always a good idea to personalize it with your own workgroup name.  Also consider, for ease of use, change/personalize the device’s Computer Name to something that makes sense to you(Many pre-built OEM devices prename the device using an unrecognizable/cryptic name or the purchase order number or model number or an odd unrecognizable alphanumeric name)
  • Configure Network Discovery Sharing profiles identically in each and every Windows logon profile on each and every device.
      • Network Discovery has three separate network sharing profiles(Private, Guest or Public and All network)
        • Private => Network Discovery(On), Automatic Setup(On), File and Printer Sharing(On)
        • Guest or Public => Network Discovery(Off), File and Printer Sharing(Off) – If needed for some specific reason, it can be turned on but for most home networking ‘Off’ is recommended.
        • All Network => Public folder sharing(On), 128 bit encryption(On), Password Protected Sharing(On)
            • Note: In a home networking situation, if the current network sharing profile is shown as ‘Public’ then file and printer sharing is not possible. Changing the network sharing profile to ‘Private’ can be accomplished via Windows 10 Settings for your type of connection(Ethernet or WIFI; if using both, change both to Private)
                    • ==>  Settings/Network & Internet/Status/Change connection Properties
  • Create and share a designated folder on each device in each windows profile in addition to the Windows 10 provided ‘Public folders’ for sharing and accessing. Creating and sharing your own designated folder on each device provides a common, unique and additional location for saving and copying files across networked devices.  Other user profiles specific folders that might be considered for sharing(e.g. Documents, Downloads, Pictures).
  • Configure your router to assign the same(Static) IP address to each device on the network
  • Create and configure a Windows Credential with each device’s ‘computername’ in each Windows logon profile with the same identical Windows logon profile(username and password)
  • Editor Note: Some application software and hardware(e.g. Printers, Scanners, Routers, etc.) may still be using an older and deprecated file sharing protocol called SMBv1. SMBv1 was deprecated for security reasons related to Ransomware malware which spread using vulnerability in the SMBv1 protocol.  Windows 10 provides support for SMBv2 and SMBv3 – the current, secure and safer protocols, but in some cases SMBv1 is still necessary(even though not recommended) for some software/hardware.  Unless absolutely necessary SMBv1 should be disabled in Windows features.
          • Microsoft maintains web page on software and hardware still using SMBv1 and can be found using the following url  => SMB1 Product Clearinghouse

 

How To:

  • Configuring Windows Services
    • The steps to re-enable the ability to view and access shared devices/computers are shown below and requires changing Windows 10 Services settings items called ‘Function Discovery Resource Publication’ ‘Function Discovery Provider Host’, SSDP and UnPnP to Automatic and Starting the service (Note The last two SSDP and UnPnP_are optional but on many devices enabling these two additional Services can be a benefit)
  1. Access the Windows 10 Run dialog box via the Start Menu/Windows System/Run option or by pressing the Win + R keys on the keyboard.   Note: One can skip Step 1 and 2 and proceed to Step 3 if accessing the Services settings via search(Click/Tap the Windows Start Menu icon and enter ‘Services’  then click or tap on Services(Desktop app)
  2. If using the Run dialog box – enter services.msc in the Run dialog box then press Return to load the Services dialog box window
  3. Scroll down in the Services window and select and double click/tap on ‘Function Discovery Resource Publication’ item(aka ‘FDResPub’ the service name assigned by Windows) to access the service’s properties
  4. Change the ‘Startup type’ field entry from ‘Manual’ to ‘Automatic’ or ‘Automatic Delayed Start’
  5. In the same properties dialog box ‘Service status’ section click on Start (to start the FDResPub service) – see pic below (If the service is already started skip this step).  A picture/graphic is shown below  of  the service being enabled and started.
  6. Once the ‘Service status’ indicator shows ‘Running’ Click ‘OK’ to close the Properties dialog box
  7. Repeat Step 3 through 6 for the other services – ‘Function Discovery Provider Host’, SSDP and ‘UnPnP’    (See Footnote [A])
  8. Close the Services window.  Close all open windows and Restart the device.

FDResPub_01

 

Footnote:  [A]

  • Other articles on the internet suggest  Removing shared locations(e.g. C:\Users) and re-adding shared locations;  or other more under-the hood measures such as editing the Windows ‘hosts’ file and adding each respective IP addresses for each shared device on the network in the ‘hosts’ file.
      • Editor Notes:
        • Removing shared locations(folder) and re-adding may help in certain cases
        • Sharing the entire C:\Users folder is not recommended since many subfolders in C:/Users are by design intent classified by Windows as ‘Hidden files and folders’ an solely unique to the Windows 10 logged on user
        • Likewise, adding assigned router ip addresses for each device in the Windows ‘hosts’ file may be another wasted effort. 
          • In general =>  It’s a good idea to avoid tampering with settings and/or files that are not necessary.

 

Revisions:

Jan 10, 2020: Initial Draft

Jan 15 2020: Original Publish Date

Summary:

A step by step guide to configuring Windows 10 devices for networking and sharing

Comments:

  • This article is intended for end-users(consumers) of Windows 10 devices desiring to network devices and share folder(s)/files across networked devices
  • This article is applicable to Windows 10 Pro and Home Editions
        • The same method/guidelines can be applied to Windows 8.1 and Windows 7 editions and devices
  • Networking related topics and configuration covered in this article are:
    • Windows logon
    • Workgroup name
    • Computer name
    • Network Discovery (for file and printer sharing)
    • Shared Folders
    • Use of unique router assigned IP address
    • Windows Credentials
    • Security (SMBv1 File Sharing protocol vulnerability)

How To:

Guidelines for Standard Network Sharing:

  • All devices should have the exact same/common Windows logon user profiles. As an example if Britney has two devices(of any type – desktop and laptop or two desktops or two laptops etc.) then Britney should configure each device with the(her) exact same Windows logon profile using the exact same username and password(The Windows logon profile can be a Microsoft Account or a Local Account).
        • The same commonality would also apply in more than one user per device across those same two or more devices (e.g. Britney and Prince Windows logon profiles with same username/password on each device)
  • Change the Workgroup name on each device from the Windows default name ‘Workgroup’ to a name of your choice(Editor note: This is optional, but since everyone on the planet for at least the last three decades knows the default Windows workgroup name, imo it’s always a good idea to personalize it with your own workgroup name).  Also consider, for ease of use, change/personalize the device’s Computer Name to something that makes sense to you(Many pre-built OEM devices prename the device using an unrecognizable/cryptic name or the purchase order number or model number or an odd unrecognizable alphanumeric name)
  • Configure Network Discovery Sharing profiles identically in each and every Windows logon profile on each and every device.
      • Network Discovery has three separate network sharing profiles(Private, Guest or Public and All network)
        • Private => Network Discovery(On), Automatic Setup(On), File and Printer Sharing(On)
        • Guest or Public => Network Discovery(Off), File and Printer Sharing(Off) – If needed for some specific reason, it can be turned on but for most home networking ‘Off’ is recommended.
        • All Network => Public folder sharing(On), 128 bit encryption(On), Password Protected Sharing(On)
            • Note: In a home networking situation, if the current network sharing profile is shown as ‘Public’ then file and printer sharing is not possible. Changing the network sharing profile to ‘Private’ can be accomplished via Windows 10 Settings for your type of connection(Ethernet or WIFI; if using both, change both to Private)
                    • ==>  Settings/Network & Internet/Status/Change connection Properties
  • Create and share a designated folder on each device in each windows profile in addition to the Windows 10 provided ‘Public folders’ for sharing and accessing. Creating and sharing your own designated folder on each device provides a common, unique and additional location for saving and copying files across networked devices.  Other user profile specific folders that might be considered for sharing(e.g. Documents, Downloads, Pictures). 
  • Configure your router to assign the same(Static) IP address to each device on the network
  • Create and configure a Windows Credential with each device’s ‘computername’ in each Windows logon profile with the same common, identical Windows logon profile(username and password)

Editor Note: Some application software and hardware(e.g. Printers, Scanners, Routers, etc.) may still be using an older and deprecated file sharing protocol called SMBv1. SMBv1 was deprecated for security reasons related to Ransomware malware which spread using vulnerability in the SMBv1 protocol.  Windows 10 provides support for SMBv2 and SMBv3 – the current, secure and safer protocols, but in some cases SMBv1 is still necessary(even though not recommended) for some software/hardware.  Unless absolutely necessary SMBv1 should be disabled in Windows features.

          • Microsoft maintains web page on application software and hardware that is still using SMBv1 and can be found using the following url:

Revisions:

Dec 15 2019: Initial Draft Date

Dec 24 2019: Original Publish Date (Merry Christmas)

Feb 22 2020: Added Comments section; Corrected/changed formatting

Summary:

Compatibility Issues with some earlier versions of Avast and AVG anti-virus editions affecting Windows 10

 Comments:

  • Microsoft and Avast have identified problems with using earlier/outdated versions of Avast and AVG anti-virus software on Windows 10 Versions 1909 and 1903
  • These compatibility issues prevent upgrading Windows 10 from an earlier version to later Windows 10 versions – 1903(May 2019 Update) and 1909(November 2019 Update)
      • Note: The inability to upgrade impacts upgrading via Windows Update, the Media Creation Tool created media, and the online Upgrade Now methods
  • The compatibility issues surfaced in late November 2019
  • Avast and AVG versions 19.5 and lower are no longer compatible with Windows 10
  • Devices with installed versions of Avast or AVG 19.5 or lower will not be offered or capable to upgrade to Windows 10 1909 or Windows 10 1903
  • End users of Avast and AVG products should/need to download and install an updated version of their Avast or AVG application – Editor Note: Preferably the latest available version
  • End users of Avast or AVG anti-virus software that install the latest version will no longer have the compatibility issue preventing upgrading Windows 10 from an earlier version to Windows 10 versions 1909 or 1903

Additional Information:

 

Revisions:

Nov 23 2019: Initial Draft Date

Nov 26 2019: Final Draft Date

Dec 1 2019: Original Publish Date

Dec 7 2019:  Added ‘Note’ and ‘Editor Note’ in the  ‘Comments’ section

Summary:

Microsoft releases Windows 10 Version 1909 November 2019 Update

Comments:

  1. Microsoft released the latest major feature update(named November 2019 Update) for Windows 10 Version 1909 Build 18363.418 today(Nov. 12, 2019)
  2. Windows 10 Version 1909 is now available to mainstream consumers and business users that wish to manually install the feature update via Windows Update ‘Check for Updates’  (Note: Not all devices may be deemed ready to install Windows 10 1909 – the most common reason would be due to a compatibility issue where a ‘safeguard hold is in place’ by Microsoft to ensure a good update experience for the respective device)
  3. Windows 10 Version 1909 is also available via The Windows 10 download site, and via the Windows 10 Media Creation Tool.  (Note: Not all devices may be deemed ready – see Note in Comment #2 above). Editor Note:  The Windows 10 Download site’s ”Update Assistant – Update Now’ option for 1909 will be available the week of November 18th)
  4. Windows 10 Version 1909 will be deployed/rolled out automatically via Windows Update(not all capable devices will receive the feature update at the same time since the deployment – rollout is staged)
  5. Windows 10 Version 1909 will update a Windows 10 device from the installed prior version of Windows 10(e.g. Windows 10 Version 1903, 1809, etc.)

 

Additional Information:

 

Revisions:

Nov 12 2019: Initial Draft

Nov 13 2019: Original Publish Date

Nov 14 2019: Added Editor Note in Comment #3 (Thank you for the ping, Rangiku[from Tokyo!])

Summary:

Overview of Edge Chromium Tracking Protection Settings and Features

Comments:

  • Edge Chromium provides a more simple user interface to configure privacy concerns on 3rd party tracking
  • Edge Chromium is currently in Beta but available for consumer via the Edge Chromium Beta Channel program
  • Edge Chromium is Microsoft’s replacement browser for Windows 10’s included Edge(HTML)
  • Edge Chromium will be available as a non-beta version in the future(expected in January 2020)

 

Tracking Prevention:

  • A more simplified user interface for configuring end-user tracking prevention
    • Edge Chromium provides three different configuration options related to tracking privacy
      • Basic
      • Balanced
      • Strict

EdgeCr_Tracking_01

  • Blocked Trackers
    • Allows one to view the sites that Edge Chromium has blocked based on your configuration setting(Basic, Balanced, Strict)
  • Exceptions
    • An option allowing the user to add specific sites that override the tracking prevention setting
  • Strict Tracking for InPrivate Browsing
    • An option to always use ‘Strict’ tracing prevention with Edge Chromium during InPrivate browsing usage. When toggled on, it will override(if chosen) the Basic and Balanced option.
  • Example of the ‘Blocked trackers’ results after casual surfing(over a 10 minute period) on the web across a variety of sites.  Note: The picture only shows the first seven(7) items in the available list.

EdgeCr_Tracking_02

Revisions:

Oct 2 2019: Initial Draft Date

Oct 3 2019: Original Publish Date